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20131202
20131210
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operation since apardth d apartheid. it raised questions about the country's leadership and power of the anc which was once unquestionably a party of the peel. with more, mike hanna in johan he johanesbur g. >> prayers for a man who touched the lives of all. an awarenets of challenges to come. the growing death between rich and poor is the most brutal reminder that mandela's promise of a better life is still to be realized. >> i think the challenge we have doesn't necessarily need man dela. it needs us in south africa to face the reality if we don't do something very logical, the why unpeople are going to revolt because if they remain poor, and a few become richer, the young people will revolt. if the fault lines within south african society have been too clear in recent times, a labor dispute that resulted in the killing of more than 30 americana last year. many argue the root cause of such violence is an africans national congress government that has lost touch with those who put it in power. >> if you look at what has been happening over the last few years in terms of public violence, you
in south africa. but having him work with his team and the pollster for the anc during that first election, there were three things that really struck me. one was just his enormous clarity and vision for the country and bringing the country together. the second was his great pragmatism. there were a set of election rules that came down that were really disadvantageous to mandela and to the anc. we were all very upset by those rules, and he was just very calm and said no, we'll make it work. find a way to make it work. he refused to fight over the rules and just said we'll make it work. >> give us some unsight into that. what were his unique qualities that allowed him to make it work? in the face of what seemed to be something that was very difficult if not insurmountable. >> i think, first of all, was just the clarity of his own vision. the amount of thinking that he had done about where he wanted to take the country and what reconciliation meant. and how he had already put that to practice. that was so fundamental to his soul. and what was interesting is, of course, there were many factio
, safety in numbers, at a time when the anc was still banned, the political situation deteriorating, violence abroad and where the isolation of south africa was impacting on the flow of anything. we found and were able to report back to our respective party leaders, and i had half an hour with an anxious, worried and very uncertain margaret thatcher. we reported back on the tragic success of apartheid in separating one person from another, on the urgency of the need for change to avoid a looming catastrophe and how the united kingdom's public position also needed to change. but we also and apparently rather unusually reported some hope. i said in the house there is a large group of people in south africa who many have ignored. they are those of all races who are working patiently for fellowship and reconciliation in pure human terms by meeting each other and sharing their lives and experiences. some of those with whom we stayed were white opponents of apartheid and have been so for decades, but all -- white and black finish were people who realized that the abolition of the legislat
a year to be members of the anc's customer loyalty program. they get at $10 discount after every $100 ticket purchases but now anc promises, quote, a chance to own a piece of the action at the same price as wall street investors, taking $2,500 of new stocks with no fees, the same terms to amc employees, hoping to raise $400 million in total, riegle is the nation's largest theater chain up 20% in the past 12 months but the customer loyalty program and to spin, studies show canceled on to a stock longer than regular investors. rather than sell and bailout true fans can buy more of it after a dip. tracy: my mom has one of those. dennis: this will be an interesting plan for moviegoers to buy stock they never would have heard about. ashley: this might follow suit. dennis: will free might be on that. ashley: as marijuana is legalized in some states one man is hoping to smoke industry competition in an attempt to establish what he calls the anheuser-busch of marijuana. justin hard field is investing in everything from retail stores, emerald green capital, sees a lot of green on the marijuana
of the a.n.c. during the '60s, who died and perhaps was killed by the south african government. a person with home your viewers may be aware of steve, murderedered in 1977. >> as we move forward and look at south africa and the issues and problems do you feel the legacy and mess age has been >> the legacy, and it goes back to the same people who fathered the youth league. south africa must be a place in which there's self determination. it goes back to the congress, going back to all who lives within it, everyone that participates in the governing structure. >> thank you for your insight. we appreciate it. >> french president issued a veiled warning to the leader of the central african republic. francis hollande warned it would be tough to keep central african republic's president in place given the worsening violence. 400 bodies have been found in the capital in the past three days. 10,000 fled the city. everyone has been ordered off the streets bar peacekeepers and bars. some images from this report may be disturbing. >> french soldiers on foot patrol in bangui. this is new to the city
economic and political waters. with the political icons demise the future of the a.n.c. is being thrown into question. mike hanna reports from johannesburg. >> prayers for a man who touched the lives of all. in the void left by nelson mandela's death, an awareness of challenges to come. the growing gap between rich and poor is a reminder of nelson mandela's promise of a better life is to be realised. >> i think the challenge we have for nelson mandela is to face the reality that if we don't do something for everybody, the young people will revolt, because if they remain poor and others are richer then they revolt. >> the fault lines within south african society is all-too clear of it was a labour dispute ruling in the killing of 30 at the mary carna mine -- marikana mine. many argue that the root cause was a government losing touch with those that put it in power. >> if you look at what happened over the last few years in terms of public violence, you can see that we have many, many people that don't feel represented by those in government. and the resort to violence is because we don'
that traditional tribal situation in south africa with the revolutionary moment of the anc and with white south africans. that was another amazing triumph of his. >> how perfectly appropriate that his homecoming will be in that place that he found so tranquil and peaceful. i want to talk to you about his time in prison. did you get a sense there was a defining moment that that shift happened for him? in prison, men are broken. he wasn't broken. >> yes. whatever the psychologists said, the same fire that melts the butter hardens the egg. it hardened him, it didn't melt him. one of the things about him, the man who went to prison was a different man that came out. >> he was hot headed. >> hot headed, tempestuous. pricen w prison was the crucible that hardened him. one day he said to me, i came out mature. very rare, a mature man. >> i told you, he said it to more than just you, why he is adamant that i am not a saint. he said that often. >> i think there's a lesson for all of us. he wasn't a saint. what he was was -- and he was proud to call himself this -- he was a politician, a politician that
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7